Where does Governance exist?

Extract from the book: Inactivity Based Cost management: Measurement of Intangible: Governance, Ethical & Fiscal Responsibility and Acountability

Where does Governance exist? The interesting quote of Robert Doniger, [from Timeline by Michael Crichton], I’m not interested in the future; I’m interested in the future of the future, possibly has a clue. To-day was the future of yesterday and tomorrow is the future of to-day as well the future of the future of yesterday. Effectively what Doniger says is that he dwells in the past all the time the fascinating historical events and ever interested in tomorrow, a dreamer and a maverick he is, that he ignores ‘to-day’ completely. Working like a beaver, he takes his scientists and cultural experts to the past making them stuck in the ruins of history and the genius that he is, promises a great future of the future making the people of to-day to sit in awe and wonder till they realize the future ever remains a distant dream. A solar view of the planet displays the monumental towers everywhere, promises that are not kept. These towers represent a cost already incurred that cannot be recovered. Donigers do not think that it is necessary for them to be concerned about to-day and not at all obliged to inform or discuss the cost consequence of their action, where to-day represents the effect of decisions of yesterday for all to see with utter helplessness. Continue reading

Intangible – the Eternal Seed

Intangible is antimatter and good similarities exist between matter & antimatter in one hand, and tangible & intangible at the other. Intangible in the mundane world of business management has been used in only one instance, otherwise, not surprisingly, not touched at all. A physics textbook describes matter as “that takes up space and has mass”. Every physical object we have ever seen consists of matter. Scientists however have been continuously exploring the existence of antimatter in the known universe. The latest experiment is with a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a 27-km long tunnel where beams of particles are fired to prove the theory that a particle when it meets its antiparticle, they annihilate each other and their entire mass is converted into pure energy. One of the LHC detectors, code named LHCb, is trying to investigate that equal amounts of matter and antimatter were created in the Big Bang and what happened to the “missing” antimatter. Continue reading